7 comments
  1. I was in Sydney last year for Anzac day. I am feeling all nostalgic. It is so very important to remember these things and never forget what past generations sacrificed for us. I want to make sure when I have children they really understand that. I am planning a tribute to my Gran in a post soon, she turns 90 this year. She lived thorough things I cannot even imagine.

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    1. Oh a tribute to your Gran for her birthday sounds lovely! 90 years = many many memories.

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  2. I went into my first ivf so freaking naive. There were so many things I thought I knew, that I really didnt. When we were able to retrieve so many eggs and then 90% of them fertilized, I knew that we would have frozen embies. Boy was I wrong, that call from the doctor absolutely devastated me. The good news on this bleak story is...... they learned something from our first attempt and will change protocoal on the second try. Everyone is learning as they go and we are all different and respond differently. Keep doing what you are right now, educate yourself and be prepared for anything.

    Your MIL sounds like a strong and determined lady. Still keeping her in my thoughts.

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    1. Thanks Toni, and you are part of the reason I am learning so much more about IVF before I begin - so thank you for bringing all that honesty out in your blog. It's hard to keep a level head with stuff like this because there is so much hoping and wishing, then there's also so much that may not go as planned.

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  3. We are also preparing to embark on our first IVF, and it's a roller coaster ride! So many choices, meds, and outcomes! I have fingers crossed that you will be successful and have your miracle baby soon. I am sorry to read about your MIL, she sounds like a resilient woman and very brave. You are all in my thoughts and prayers.

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  4. I agree with you that you can't really know how far you're willing to go until you're in the thick of it. I started off thinking I wouldn't do IVF, but now I'm willing to do it. I didn't want to entertain the notion of using donor eggs if mine turned out to be crap, but now I'm open to it. Things are in a constant state of change on this journey.

    As for your PCOS, I would hazard a guess that you still have it. It's not really something that ever goes away, but the symptoms can lessen (or even disappear) with medication/lifestyle changes/dumb luck. I was diagnosed with it several years ago. I had very long, irregular periods, was overweight, and my hormones were all out of whack. I managed to lose a lot of weight and that lessened my symptoms to the point where doctors are now confused about whether or not I have PCOS. Personally, I think it's still there; I just learned how to manage it better.

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    1. Thanks Jenny. I just have this weird feeling that I'm going to get some bad news about my ovaries during our first IVF cycle. Your comment has got me thinking, and I might do another post on this to help me nut out what's going through my head on PCOS. I really appreciate your comments!

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